Crush PDF Book by Carrie Mac PDF ePub

Crush

by
3.711,740 votes • 131 reviews
Published 01 Mar 2006
Crush.pdf
Format Hardcover
Pages106
Edition10
Publisher Orca Book Publishers
ISBN 1551435217
ISBN139781551435213
Languageeng



Because of a moment of indiscretion, Hope's parents send her to New York to spend the summer with her hipster sister while they travel to Thailand. Miserable, Hope ends up meeting Nat, and developing a powerful crush. The only problem is that Nat is a girl. Hope is pretty sure she isn't gay. Or is she? Struggling with new feelings, fitting in and a strange city far from home, Hope finds that love--and acceptance--comes in many different forms.

Crush Reviews

Lauren
4
Fri, 28 Sep 2012

I didn't realize this book was about lesbians when I started reading it but there is nothin graphic in it and only took me a couple hours to read.

Laura
- Northborough, MA
4
Thu, 12 Jun 2014

I read the book " Crush" by Carrie Mac. It was a surprising, and changed the perspective of what you would think could happened. This book was about a girl named Hope and her parents are going away for two months and is sending her off to her sisters in New York. She has never been away from her parents for more then a few nights. During this novel, Hope goes through a lot of different emotions and changes. And she also met a girl named Nat,who took a main part of this book. If you want to find out what happened with her and Nat, read the book! I would recommend this book for anyone looking for a quick read, and an interesting one about a teenage girl. I thought this book was weird but fun to read!

AnnaBnana
- Omaha, NE
2
Wed, 09 Apr 2008

This is a hi-lo book and that's important to keep in mind. I didn't hate it, but I did feel like the story moved too slowly and then really quickly. It took a long time to get to the meat of the plot and then the wrap-up felt really rushed.

N.K.
4
Fri, 11 Jul 2014

Disclaimer: At the time of writing this reflection the book has no rating. I will give it a rating later on in the year to keep my Goodreads recommendations somewhat accurate however I'm not a big into rating books on a five star system nor am I big into rating books as soon as you finish them. I believe it needs some time to digest before you decide whether you even like the book you were reading. Sometimes what you take from the book is more important than the process of getting that information. That said, I will write this book reflection now, a few days after finishing this book, just to get more in the habit of writing book reflections. Note how I say reflection, not review. This is more of what I was experiencing while reading this book than a complete evaluation of the book as a product.
---
If I wanted to write a really positive reflection about Crush I could but I could very easily write a really negative reflection. It really just depends how seriously you take this book. This is more of a light, fluffy book, there to make you feel better. If you question the often times absurd plot points -- okay Park Slope is not this small, you don't bump into the same people all the time -- the book is trash. If you ignore how the characters get together, and just absorb the genuine truthful encounter of a naive, childlike crush, than this book is really amazing and feel good. Though it is a 'queer issue' book, the main character is from such an extreme leftist background, her insecurities are more over change, and newness, than internalized homophobia (though she drops dyke/queer bombs way too much), which creates a really romantic...stupid lucky plot about coming out.
It's a queer fantasy. Like hey wouldn't it be cool if this was my coming out story. This isn't stressful at all! That said many queer people live in less dramatic (and probably also just as dramatic) forms of this main characters family life (leftist commune) so there would be plenty of readers who would pick this up and not feel the pangs of jealousy that I felt while reading this. I jealous because it was just so easy for the main character. I just.. I just wonder what it is like for it to not be the biggest struggle in your life. For it to be a two day headache, that is shrunk because you are surrounded by so much support, and then for the problem of it to not exist anymore. For queerness to just be. In this sense, this book is triggering for us closeted folx. Her coming out is simple, her finding a girlfriend is simple, it is so so simple, I guess that's what romantic fantasy is supposed to be. And when you let go from your closeted, insecure, jealous problems, and just empath with the characters, it is really sweet. It feels just like a childish crush -- no queer issues attached. It feels hopeful and beautiful, warm and not intimidating, obsessive but not poisonous, just... fun.
So I go back to my first point, don't take this book so seriously. It is there for younger people to bask in their naive, hopeful, crushes that aren't quite yet nightmares. That are pleasant to have when you are straight and could be the same for queer people too -- if you don't have too much internalized issues. This is a precious gift to the young queer community. You can be cute crushes too.

Misty
- Salt Lake City, UT
5
Thu, 13 Jun 2013

....that's it!?
Oh my god. I loved this book. I wish there was more to it. The ending was so abrupt (cute, but too fast). I wanted it to keep going! It kept me interested through the entire (SHORT) book. More, more! I want more.

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